Bruce Lee (Commodore 64) review

 

Blimey. It’s been a while since I added anything to this blog, hasn’t it? Don’t worry, RetroReactiv8 is still alive and kicking – it’s just that every time I sit down to try and write something normal life gets in the way…

Anyway, let’s get things back on track with a review of Bruce Lee on the Commodore 64.

Bruce Lee - cover

This early DataSoft game narrowly missed out on a place in my Top 10 Commodore 64 games a while back, and I felt a bit guilty about it. So now it’s time to redress the balance by giving it the full review treatment.

Bruce Lee is an early (and very successful) example of using a well-known name to sell a game. Happily, (unlike many similar examples), it’s a great game with a recognisable name attached, rather than a recognisable name linked to a rubbish game.

At heart, Bruce Lee is a platform game with some fighting elements thrown in. Bruce must negotiate his way across a series of screens, collecting the lanterns that are scattered around each level and avoiding the various hazards that will kill him if he comes into contact with them. Bruce is pursued by a black-clad Ninja and a green (bad sushi?) Sumo wrestler (which, for some reason, myself and a friend christened Desmond Littlefellow and (you guessed it) Desmond Bigfellow. They did actually both have proper names, but this is what we always called them, so it’s how I’ll be referring to them throughout this review).

The two Desmonds will pursue Bruce across the level and attempt to beat him up. Although you can outrun them (getting to the exit on a particular screen resets their starting position for the next level), you might prefer to teach them a lesson and fight them, since Bruce is pretty handy with his fists (and his feet), and more than capable of looking after himself.

Although both can be equally fatal to Bruce, Desmond and Desmond have distinctive fighting styles, making them challenging in different ways. Desmond Littlefellow is quick and agile, with a big stick that increases his range. However, his attacks are weaker and do a little less damage. Desmond Bigfellow is slower and heavier, but Bruce can withstand fewer hits before dying.

Like much else in the game, once you get the hang of the fighting, it’s pretty easy to make sure you rarely die at the Desmonds’ hands, but killing them never becomes dull. Indeed, the game should be applauded for the imaginative ways you can kill your opponents and there’s a sick sense of satisfaction to be derived from standing deliberately just out of range and luring them into a trap (such as an exploding firework) to dispatch them in new and interesting ways!

The platform elements are really well-designed. New hazards are gradually introduced (such as fireworks that explode a second after you have run over them or electrified areas where runs have to be timed right to get past). This gives a real sense of progress and achievement. Although there’s a reasonable level of precision needed, the game doesn’t feature the pixel-perfect jumping that made games like Manic Miner so hard. As such, I’ve always found it a lot more fun to play. With practice, you really start to make progress and levels become fun (leaving you free to do the above-mentioned taunting and luring). When you’ve finished the game, it’s an ideal candidate for a speed run, if that’s your thing, and the whole thing has a tremendous amount of replay value.

Bruce Lee - start

The graphics do an excellent job of creating and maintaining an appropriate and convincing setting and doing homage to a martial arts icon. Bruce Lee is instantly recognisable and fluidly animated. He moves with a real sense of purpose and style and is fast and agile, thus capturing the character extremely well. The two Desmonds are also well-animated, whilst the varied (and impressively big for its day) scenery definitely creates an oriental atmosphere.

Audio is similarly limited, but effective. The only music of note is on the game’s title screen, but it’s a brilliant piece that again adds to the oriental setting. The lack of in-game music doesn’t prove to be an issue at all, because whilst the sound effects are relatively sparse, they really add to the game. In fact, I genuinely think constant in-game music would have had a detrimental impact on the overall atmosphere and it’s better off without.

It’s interesting to play Bruce Lee again after first experiencing it as a child. I often bemoan my lack of gaming prowess, particularly as I get older and my reflexes get even worse. However, back in the 80s I really can’t remember ever beating Bruce Lee – something which, frankly, I’m astounded at now. Because whilst the game offers some challenge, once you’ve got the hang of it, it’s actually pretty easy to beat. I can now beat it every single time I play and on a couple of occasions have even got close to making it all the way through without losing a life. That is unheard of for me, so how I failed to beat it as a kid is beyond me.

Anyhow, despite missing out on a place in my C64 Top 10 games, justice has finally been done for Bruce Lee in the form of a complete review. The man was a martial arts legend and a Commodore 64 gaming legend. Not bad for someone who had been dead for over 10 years by the time this game was released.

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2 thoughts on “Bruce Lee (Commodore 64) review

  1. Bruce Lee is an awesome game. I agree that beating up the ninja never gets old. Back in the day my uncle and I would double team him (one of us controlled Bruce and the other Green Desmond.) Like you, I never managed to beat the game as a kid, but completed it with little trouble a few years ago on a C64 emulator. I assumed that the C64 version was easier than the Amstrad port I played as a lad.

    Liked by 1 person

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